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Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff)

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) - Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) : Encyclopedia of Dog Breeds; Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Ratings: - Ease of Training: 8 /10 - Intelligence: 8 /10 - Shedding: 9 /10 - Watchdog: 10 /10 - Guard Dog: 10 /10 - Popularity: 4 /10 - Size: 8 /10 - Agility: 7 /10 - Good with Kids: 10 /10 Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) ... Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff)


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Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff)

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff)

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff)

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Ratings:

- Ease of Training: 8/10
- Intelligence: 8/10
- Shedding: 9/10
- Watchdog: 10/10
- Guard Dog: 10/10
- Popularity: 4/10
- Size: 8/10
- Agility: 7/10
- Good with Kids: 10/10

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Attributes:

Life Expectancy: 10-12 years
Litter Size: 4-8 puppies, average 6 puppies
Group: Miscellaneous Class
Recognized By: AKC, FCI, NKC, APRI, ACR, ACA, DRA, BBC, NAPR
Color: Completely white; only one black or dark coloured patch around the eye may be admitted, provided that it does not cover more than 10% of the head. Between two dogs of equal conformation, the judge should always choose the whiter one.
Hair Length: Short
Size: Large, Extra Large
Shedding: Heavy Shed
Male Height: 24-27 inches (60-68.5 cm)
Male Weight: 80-100 pounds (36-45 kg)
Female Height: 23.5-27 inches (60-68.5 cm)
Female Weight: 80-100 pounds (36-45 kg)
Living Area:
They are not recommended for apartment living. They do best in a securely fenced yard, although they will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised and does best with at least an average-sized yard. They do not tolerate low temperatures (below freezing).
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Complete information about Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Breed:


Overview :

Argentine Dogo, also known as the Argentine dog and the Argentine Mastiff is the one and only pure breed dog that originated from Cordova Argentina. Argentine Dogo is a large game hunting dog that can look so powerful and ferocious and yet can be a so friendly. In spite of the excellent muscle structure, the thundering bark and the powerful look, an Argentine Dogo would love to be constantly petted; they need physical contact so much so that they would sprawl on your lap, lean against your leg and would not lie at your feet but on your feet. Argentine Dogos are wonderful house pets as the owners would enjoy playing with this large fierce looking but lovable dog. These dogs are known to be quiet inside the house but would be vivacious and playful when let out. Owner and pet would enjoy a playful romp in the yard. Argentine Dogos are strong willed and highly intelligent creatures. Any sign of threat to the owners would be met with a ferocious thundering bark. These impressive powerful dogs that are originally developed to hunt wild boars, dogs are now utilized by the police and military people in search and rescue operations, in narcotics detection and watch dogging. Additionally, these dogs are now used as guide dogs for the blinds to keep them safe and secure, as well. Due to the dog’s hound heritage, it possesses a strong prey urge. Cats and other small pets therefore, should not be kept in close proximity unless the dog and the other pets were raised together. Argentine Dogos are known to be strong willed and independent. Some are even obstinate and domineering. An owner would need to be confident and consistently show the dog who is the boss. Some people are intimidated by its strength and temperament. There are some areas where these dogs are banned not because of its intimidating looks but because the breed was once used in organized dog fights. Really a sad thing as it was actually the owners who were responsible for this occurrence and not the breed.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) History :

The Dogo Argentino dog breed originated from the province of Cordova Argentina. History has it that the breed was developed in 1925 by Antonio Nores Martinez, a barely 18 year old lad that was helped by his younger brother Agustin. Antonio and Agustin are both avid hunters and dog lovers. Antonio have envisioned breeding a dog that will have great energy and endurance, qualities of a good hunter and at the same time a dog that will be both fierce and loyal to be a guard dog and a pet of the family. The fighting dog of Cordova, a breed that consist of Mastiff, Bull terrier, Boxer and English bulldog was used as the foundation of the breed that will be created. Although the fighting dog of Cordova is a fierce fighter and a skilled and dexterous hunter, the dog still does not have all the qualities Antonio is looking for in an ideal hunting dog. Antonio developed the Argentine Dogo by cross breeding the fighting dog of Cordova with ten other breeds. The new breed is hoped to eliminate the fighting enthusiasm of the dog while enhancing the hunting instinct. The Pointer was chosen for its sharp sense of smell that will be important in a hunt; the Boxer for its vitality and gentleness; the Great Dane for its impressive size; the Bull terrier for its ferociousness; the Bulldog for its physique; the Irish wolfhound for its prowess of stalking wild game; the Dogue de Bordeaux for its powerful jaws; the Great Pyrenees for its beautiful white coat and the Spanish mastiff would contribute its power. The breeding would be an impossible feat as both Antonio and Agustin are still in school but they were helped by their father who hired a kennel and shouldered some of the expenses. In 1928, Antonio wrote the first standard of the breed and the Argentine Dogo was formally born. Unfortunately, Antonio was killed while hunting. Agustin took over; worked on the new breed, moved the breeding headquarters from Cordova to Southern Argentina. Agustin Nores Martinez later on became Argentina’s ambassador to Canada. He took the opportunity to spread Argentine Dogos in all the places he visited. The Argentine Dogos became a legend as people in Argentina as well as the neighboring countries used the dog to hunt wild boar and puma. The Argentine Dogo was favored by people who have an unaccountable liking for dog fighting. Because of this, the breed has gained a negative reputation. The dog was one of the breeds that were banned by the Dangerous Dog Act of 1991. The Argentine Dogo posses all the qualities of its ancestors, fierce, enduring, fast and powerful making it and excellent hunting dog, but the dog is also playful, gentle and protective of its family… a loving family pet just like the one Antonio Nores Martinez have envisioned.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Temperament and Character :

The Argentine Dogo is a loyal dog who makes a great guardian of the home and family. Playful and very good with children, giving kisses and cuddling. Highly intelligent and powerful, Dogos are easy to train if you are consistent, using loving but firm authority. The Argentine Dogo is not a breed for everyone. With the right owners even the more dominant Dogos can be submissive towards all humans and other animals. This breed needs someone who understands how to display leadership. Humans who are firm, confident, and consistent, this breed needs rules he must follow and limits to what he is and is not allowed to do. The objective in training this dog is to achieve a pack leader status. It is a natural instinct for a dog to have an order in their pack. When we humans live with dogs, we become their pack. The entire pack cooperates under a single leader. Lines are clearly defined. You and all other humans MUST be higher up in the order than the dog. That is the only way your relationship can be a success. When you put this breed with a meek or passive owner, problems may arise as the dog will feel he needs to, "save his pack" and run the show. Adult Dogos can be aggressive with other dogs however, the Dogo does not usually provoke the confrontation but may if he senses another dog who is unstable. The breed needs an owner who can tell the Dogo it is not his job to put another dog in his place. They are good with other pets if they are raised with them from puppyhood. This white mastiff needs early socialization with other animals. It also requires early obedience training.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Health Care :

About 10% of Dogo Argentinos born deaf due to their white color. They are also prone to hip dysplasia and sun-burn.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Grooming :

Unlike other dogs that need daily grooming because of their long coats of hair, an Argentine Dogo needs minimum grooming. The short coat would need to be brushed once a week with a rubber curry to keep the coat in good condition as well as remove loose hairs. This is one breed of dog that has no doggy smell. Nevertheless, bathing with a shampoo specially made for white coats is suggested. Aside from the regular cleaning of ears and teeth, attention must be given on the nails of the dogs. The nails of an Argentine Dogo have a tendency to grow very fast and as such would need to be regularly trimmed.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Training :

Early and intense socialization and obedience training is an absolute must. This breed is highly intelligent and training must be done with respect, love, firmness, fairness, and consistency. The Dogo Argentino responds well to reward and they enjoy working and pleasing their owners.Unpredictable behavior can occur if training is done with harshness, kennel isolation, or a regime of tough training. They excel in agility, as guide dogs, and police work.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Activity and Exercise :

Dogo Argentino is a muscular breed and he needs a daily exercise to maintain his muscle structure, so Dogo Argentinos need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) Photos:

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) breed Photo
Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) breed Photos

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff) breed Photos

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Complete information about Dogo Argentino dog breed.

Dogo Argentino (Argentino Mastiff)

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