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General information about dogs feeding

General information about dogs feeding - Dogs Food and nutrition Articles

General information about dogs feeding : Dogs Food and nutrition Articles; " style="max-width: 700px" /> Regardless of size, all dogs need a diet with a moderate balance of protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals. Carbohydrates (corn, rice, wheat, and soy are examples) should make up about 50% of the diet, and proteins (meat and meat byproducts) about 20%. Necessary vitamins include ... General information about dogs feeding



General information about dogs feeding

General information about dogs feeding

General information about dogs feeding
Regardless of size, all dogs need a diet with
a moderate balance of protein,
carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, and minerals.
Carbohydrates (corn, rice, wheat, and soy are
examples) should make up about 50% of the
diet, and proteins (meat and meat byproducts)
about 20%.
Necessary vitamins include the complexes of
A, B, C, D, E, and K. Minerals include
calcium, potassium, sodium, and
magnesium, plus trace amounts of many
others. Almost any "premium" brand of dog
food will contain the balanced nutrients your
dog needs, so don't worry about reinventing
the wheel. Avoid cheap brands, as they often
contain fillers that provide no nutritional
value to your dog. Remember, anything your
dog eats that isn't used by his body will be
coming out the other end. A higher-quality
dog food will cut down on waste volume.
Dry dog foods are healthier for your dog, as
canned and semi-moist foods can contain up
to 75% water, color-enhancers, and
preservatives. Dry foods also exercise your
dogs teeth and gums. Canned and semi-moist
foods can be given occasionally as a treat,
however, without doing any harm. In fact, it
surely does some good, because who isn't
happier (and therefore healthier) after the
occasional dessert?
Dogs are omnivores, and most will eat fresh
vegetables and non-meat table scraps. Overconsumption
of any one food item can cause
symptoms like diarrhea, vomiting, and
sometimes death, so be certain that
vegetables and table scraps are given
infrequently as treats, and are not the dog's
main food source. Table scraps are usually
heavy on fat and salt, and will eventually
make your dog's weight balloon. It can also
make him a finicky eater, refusing his
regular food in hopes of "the good stuff."
If you give your dog bones, thoroughly
cooked beef bones are the safest. Chicken
and pork bones can splinter in your dog's
mouth or throat. Even appropriate bones can
cut or scrape gums and lips, so don't give
them too often.
Puppies, pregnant or nursing dogs, and very
active dogs need more protein and calories.
Older, overweight, or less active adult dogs
need less fat, more fiber, and fewer calories.
Look for a food that is specially formulated
to meet your dog's needs.
Use the guidelines on your dog food package
when deciding how much food to provide,
but watch your dog's weight and adjust the
amount you feed accordingly. A dog of
normal weight will have an indented waist
when viewed from above, with visible ribs
that can easily be felt. Obesity is the leading
nutritional disorder found in dogs, which can
lead to serious health problems and a shorter
life.
If your dog is getting heavy, modify your
feeding habits. Schedule feeding once per
day, or look for food that's specially
formulated with fewer calories, less fat, and
higher fiber to help your dog lose or
maintain his weight. Some dogs, on the other
hand, need to gain weight. Consider leaving
dry food out at all times (called "free
feeding") or moisten the food with water or
unsalted meat broth to make it more
palatable.
When changing your dog's regular diet to a
new one, do it slowly, over a seven to ten
day period. Gradually add more of the new
food, while reducing the amount of your
previous food, until you are feeding only the
new diet. This slow transition will help avoid
any digestive upset.
As long as you feed a complete and balanced
diet, there is no need to supplement with
vitamins or minerals unless recommended by
your veterinarian.
Foods that are dangerous to your dog include
chocolate, sugar, mushrooms, and alcohol. A
good phone number to have handy is the
National Animal Poison Control Center ,
in case you're ever in doubt
about something your dog has eaten.


General information about dogs feeding