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Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems

Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems - Dogs Dental Care Articles

Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems : Dogs Dental Care Articles; Our pets are living longer now than in the past. Today, we have better preventive medicine (e.g., vaccinations) and better ways to diagnose and treat many diseases. Now we are seeing more animals whose most severe medical problems are dental problems. To prevent oral disease, which is the number one ... Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems


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Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems

Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems

Our pets are living longer now than in the past. Today, we have better preventive medicine (e.g., vaccinations) and better ways to diagnose and treat many diseases. Now we are seeing more animals whose most severe medical problems are dental problems. To prevent oral disease, which is the number one health problem diagnosed in pets, it is essential to provide our pets with good dental care, both professionally and at home.


DOGS WITH DENTAL DISEASE can shed bacteria into the bloodstream. These bacteria may go to the heart, kidneys, or other organs and cause infections there. Periodontal disease involves inflammation and infection that destroys tissues supporting teeth, including gums, periodontal ligaments and tooth sockets. These dogs are often in pain, which may affect their appetite and cause them to eat less. If the disease is severe, they may lose teeth and even develop bone infections near the affected teeth.

PLAQUE AND BACTERIA, along with oral infections, also contribute to bad breath.

HEALTHY TEETH AND GUMS are a great start to having a healthy dog!

Solution :
Dental care does not have to be difficult. We recommend four core steps that, when performed regularly, will do the most to ensure your dog’s good oral health.
1. Have your dog’s teeth and gums evaluated and cleaned by your veterinarian on a routine basis
2. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly with a toothpaste specially made for dogs
3. If you cannot brush, use a bacteria-killing dental solution or use a dental cleaning pad daily
4. Offer your dog teeth-cleaning toys, rawhide, and treats



Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems

Dental disease in dogs and cats
Plaque: Dogs or cats rarely get cavities, but are much more prone to gum disease and excess tartar buildup on the teeth. Food particles and bacteria collect along the gumline, forming plaque. Routine home dental care can remove this plaque.
Tartar: If plaque is not removed, minerals in the saliva combine with the plaque and form tartar (or calculus) which adheres strongly to the teeth. Plaque starts to mineralize 3-5 days after it forms. Tartar is irritating to the gums and causes inflammation, called gingivitis. This can be seen as reddening of the gums adjacent to the teeth. It also causes bad breath. Once tartar appears, it is best to have a professional cleaning done by your veterinarian who will use special instruments to remove the plaque and then polish the teeth to make it more difficult for plaque to adhere to them.
Periodontal disease: If tartar is not removed, it builds up under the gums. It separates the gums from the teeth to form "pockets" and encourages even more bacterial growth. At this point the damage is irreversible, and called "periodontal" disease. It can be very painful and can lead to loose teeth, abscesses, and bone loss or infection. As bacterial growth continues to increase, the bacteria may enter the bloodstream. This can cause infection of the heart valves (endocarditis), liver, and kidneys. If treated by your veterinarian with special instruments and procedures, periodontal disease can be slowed or stopped.
What is included in a good dental care program?
The 3 keys to complete dental care are:
  • Regular visits to your veterinarian, which include an oral exam
  • Veterinary dental cleaning as advised
  • Daily home oral care
1.Oral exams by your veterinarian: A thorough dental exam can identify potential problems such as plaque and tartar buildup, gingivitis, periodontal disease, and fractured or abscessed teeth. During an oral exam your veterinarian will:
  • Examine the face and head for asymmetry, swelling, or discharges.
  • Examine the oral cavity, oral mucosa, and surfaces of teeth and gums.
  • Open the mouth to examine the inner surfaces of the teeth and gums and the tongue, palates, oral mucosa, tonsils, and ventral tongue area.
2.Dental cleaning by your veterinarian: To prevent dental disease, your pet needs routine dental care at home. To perform good home care, you need to start with clean teeth. Brushing will remove plaque but not tartar. So if your pet's teeth have tartar, it is necessary for your veterinarian to remove it and polish the teeth. This professional veterinary dental cleaning is also called a prophylaxis or "prophy." A routine dental cleaning consists of:
  • Anesthetizing your pet and flushing the mouth with a solution to kill the bacteria.
  • Cleaning the teeth with handheld and ultrasonic scalers. All calculus is removed from above and below the gumline.
  • Using a disclosing solution to show any areas of remaining calculus which are then removed.
  • Polishing the teeth to remove microscopic scratches.
  • Inspecting each tooth and the gum around it for any signs of disease.
  • Flushing the mouth, again, with an antibacterial solution.
  • Recording any abnormalities or additional procedures on a dental chart.
  • Determining the best follow-up and home dental care program for your pet.

How long would you go without brushing your teeth?



3.Daily home oral care: Home oral care includes routine examinations of your pet's mouth and brushing her teeth.
Home oral exam - As you care for your pet's mouth, look for warning signs of gum disease such as bad breath, red and swollen gums, a yellow-brown crust of tartar around the gumline, and pain or bleeding when you touch the gums or mouth. You should also watch for discolored, fractured, or missing teeth. Any bumps or masses within the mouth should also be checked by your veterinarian.


Daily brushing - Regular brushing of your pet's teeth is a very important preventive for oral and other diseases. A step-by-step procedure for providing this care is found in our articles:


https://www.vetarena.org/dogs-dental-care-articles/48/how-brush-dogs-teeth-full-guide-video.html


Mechanical removal of plaque - For dogs, mechanical removal of plaque can also be accomplished by using toys such as Dental Chew Attacker or mint rawhide chips. Do not use toys that are abrasive and can wear down the teeth. If your dog is an aggressive chewer and likes to bite down, trying to crack the toy, you probably should not let the dog chew on that toy. For especially aggressive chewers, look for toys they cannot get their mouths around. Rawhide or other chews that soften as the dog chews are another option.


Routine Checkups:
Dental Exam & Recommended Cleanings. On a regular basis, take your pet to a veterinarian for a thorough dental exam - at least once a year. Cats and small breed dogs will generally require more frequent professional cleanings than larger breeds.
Teaching your pet to accept a regular dental program early in life is by far the easiest way to keep plaque at bay. Here are some easy first steps toward a lifetime of good dental health, whether you're working with a pup or an older friend:




Week 1
First, your pet will need to become comfortable with you handling and examining her mouth.
  • Start by holding your pet's head steady with one hand.
  • Gently stroke the outside of the muzzle with your fingers, then lift her top lip to expose the teeth, touch her front teeth, side, molars, etc.
  • Always speak calmly during these "desensitizing" sessions, and keep them short - less than 30 seconds is fine.
  • Praise with a treat when finished, so your pet remembers the process as a positive experience.
Week 2
As your dog becomes more comfortable…
  • Start using one or two fingers to gently rub her teeth, helping her get used to the sensation of brushing and slightly longer sessions - about a minute.
  • We recommend dipping your fingers in some beef juice (or tuna for cats) to make the routine a rewarding experience for your pet.
  • Praise with a treat when finished, so your pet remembers the process as a positive experience.
Week 3
It's time to start cleaning teeth!
  • A natural transition between using your fingers and a toothbrush is to try a fingertip brush dipped in Dental Cleanser, or use a pre-soaked Dental Clens Pad.
  • Praise with a treat when finished, so your pet remembers the process as a positive experience.
  • Like any good routine, try to remain consistent with your habits.



Do not forget :
1.BRUSH TEETH DAILY
2.
OFFER A DENTAL TREAT
3.
SCHEDULE ORAL EXAMS








_____________________
Drs. Foster & Smith


Complete Dogs Dental care and teeth problems